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Women in Music

Women in Music Anne Murray Recently, while doing some research I was reminded that the history of ranking and rating recording artists really does give women the short shrift. My next post will be on May 6, it's the third anniversary of writing my blog and a bit too close to Mother's Day for this topic. So I'm getting ahead of that to celebrate Women (and many of them mothers) in music.  A  clue on Jeopardy also piqued my interest to dedicate a post. It was from April 7, 2021, "Last name of Fanny, seen here, (picture shown) some of her compositions were originally published under her brother Felix's name" and a contestant got it right, I however had no answer. I will get to that a bit later. I have pointed to this issue before, in several of my posts I discuss the lists of the greatest of this or that and in one post I was pointing out the systematic low ratio of airplay given to female Country singers. Last year women had 23% of the #1 songs, this is the high

Born on the Bayou

Born on the Bayou Just like the food, Cajun and Creole music has its own flavour. From the south part of Louisiana (in major cities such as Lafayette and Lake Charles) just west of New Orleans, music from the Bayou extends down to the coast and into Texas. Historically, both the Cajun and Creole people are descendants of the Acadians, who were primarily from what is now the Maritime Region of Canada. They were mainly from Nova Scotia but also from Canada's only French-speaking province of Quebec. It's a long story that I'm not very qualified to tell but Colonial French-speaking people were effectively expelled from their homeland and eventually settled in Louisiana starting in the mid-1700s. The music of the region reflects some of their French Canadian Catholic backgrounds, and like many migrants, they took the easiest instruments to carry when they relocated, in this 'case' it was one of their favourites, the fiddle. Added to the fiddle after the migration was the

The 1960's

  The 1960's Fully discussing a decade of music in one post is nearly impossible, but if you look back, I have done blogs titled: 1960, 1969 and The Greatest Pop Rock Ballads of the '60s. I’ve also featured a number of artists and songs that were prominent during those 10 years. However, there are a number of significant gaps where I have missed singers, groups and songs that were popular in the 60s and many have an enduring quality as well. Certainly, the TV and Movie Industry has done a great job using songs from this era, whether the subject matter was from this time period or not. Apart from many of the songs being a lot of fun, others, including myself, have described the 1960s pop music scene as being divided by pre- and post-Beatles/"British Invasion". At the same time, while the Fab Four and similar bands had a significant impact, and were followed by the inevitable look and soundalike bands, enter ' The Monkees ', but not everyone was trying to emulat

Instrumental Songs

Instrumental Pop Songs The instrumental Pop song is very much a thing of the past. At one time there would be several instrumentals on the mainstream charts, some would even hit #1. These days pop artists rarely release singles without vocals, such fare is relegated to the odd addition on an album or in a live performance while the singer takes a break. There are of course instrumental versions of well known popular vocal songs, " Over the Rainbow "(1939) is a melody everyone knows and since David Rose and His Orchestra released the first instrumental in 1942 there are at least three or four new versions every year, totalling into the many hundreds. In 1965, the same year "Yesterday" came out George Martin and His Orchestra released an instrumental version titled " Scramble Egg ", while nobody uses the original working title there are over 500 non-vocal tracks of the song, such as a recent one by the Jazz guitarist Al Di Meola . The Beatles themselves rec